Where Innovative Curriculum Scholarship is Cultivated

The JCT and Bergamo Leadership Group is pleased to announce that the second keynote will be a Tribute to Maxine Greene, which will feature a panel of speakers.

The deadline for submissions is August 14th!

We also remind you to visit http://www.jctonline.org/conference/2014-call-for-proposals/ for the full CFP for this year’s conference. Please register soon as there are some discounts for early registration. Additionally, book your rooms and reserves your meals ASAP. The Bergamo Conference Center has a limited supply of rooms available.

Any questions? Please email gabe@jctonline.org.
Best,

The Bergamo Leadership Group

The JCT and Bergamo Leadership Group is pleased to announce that Denise Taliaferro Baszile, Ph.D., Miami University will be giving one of the three keynote addresses at this year’s conference.

We also remind you to visit http://www.jctonline.org/conference/2014-call-for-proposals/ for the full CFP for this year’s conference. Please register soon as there are some discounts for early registration. Additionally, book your rooms and reserves your meals ASAP. The Bergamo Conference Center has a limited supply of rooms available.

Any questions? Please email gabe@jctonline.org.
Best,

The Bergamo Leadership Group

Online proposal submission
opens

June 23rd, 2014

 

Submit proposal no later than
August 17, 2014

 

35th Annual Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice

Continuing Complexities: Curriculum Theory within the intersections of the past, present and future

Dates
October 9-11, 2014

Location
Bergamo Conference Center
Dayton, Ohio
View Map and/Get Directions


As contemporary education reform continues to transform public education, an opportunity to simultaneously self-reflect and collaborate across a variety of theoretical perspectives seems appropriate. Given the legacies within curriculum theory for these pursuits and the possible critical examination of their intersections, this year’s conference offers an opportunity for scholarly work that examines and troubles the role of curriculum theory in an ever-shifting context through/within an examination of the experience of being and/or/with a move across disciplines. Collaboration, critique, and reflection are at the heart of such a process of curriculum theorizing and provide fertile ground for an exploration of both theoretical and material implications.

We invite teachers, students, scholars, theorists, administrators, and cultural workers to join us in this endeavor at the Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice. Reflecting our commitment to advance understandings of curriculum and practice, this year’s conference features speakers whose work challenges us to imagine new possibilities for curriculum and educational theorizing. The “Provoking Dialogue(s)” sessions return for a fifth year allowing for us to engage in communal discussion of new and classic curriculum texts. The conference also will feature diverse and dynamic all-conference sessions, nightly social and cultural events, and professional development opportunities targeted at current graduate students.

Organizers invite a wide range of submissions that revolve around, but are not limited to, the following categories:

  • Cultural Studies and Curriculum
  • International/Transnational Curriculum Discourses
  • Literacies, Autobiography, and Curriculum History
  • Higher Education and Curriculum Theorizing
  • Curriculum Studies and Philosophical Perspectives
  • Curriculum Theory, Classroom Practice, and Disciplinary Perspectives

Theme

Continuing Complexities: Curriculum Theory within the intersections of the past, present and future

The theme of the 2014 Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice looks to continue curriculum theory’s embracing and contestation of its past, present, and future by focusing on the inherent epistemological and ontological messiness of a complicated terrain. This year’s call seeks proposals that invoke a reflective and relational process involving not only historical positioning but also concerns of the self, place, the material, and the theoretical. Proposals are encouraged to simultaneously consider the past, present, and future in relation as to avoid the desire to simply latch onto the future as an abandonment of the problems of the present or dwell in nostalgia of the past. Instead, participants should see this year’s theme as an opportunity to reject not only temporal divisions, but also all those that serve as barriers to new ways of understanding and being in curriculum scholarship.


Keynote Speakers

  • Denise Taliaferro Baszile, Ph.D., Miami University
  • A Tribute to Maxine Greene
  • TBD

All-Conference Sessions

There are several all-conference sessions planned for this year’s conference. Past topics of these sessions include cultural studies, oral history and curriculum studies, global imaginations in curriculum studies, and social class privilege. More information about these sessions will be provided in the coming months.


Provoking Dialogue(s)

In its fourth year, the “Provoking Dialogue(s)” series provides opportunities for authors or editors of books that are significant within the curriculum studies field, dialoguers who are also notable scholars within the field, and the audience to engage in provocative dialogues using the featured book as a jumping off point.


Book Sale

The annual Bergamo book sale is a tradition of the conference, with major curriculum theory texts available for purchase every year. If you would like your book to be featured please contact Gabriel Huddleston at gabe@jctonline.org.


For More Info

About the Conference

The Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice has served as a gathering place for theorists/practitioners and practitioners/theorists, including teachers, students, scholars, administrators, cultural workers, from various perspectives and all walks of life, to join in dialogical and collaborative encounters since 1969. Committed to bringing different and diverse discourses into public conversations, the conference welcomes all viewpoints in forming a shared community of dissensus. The conference encourages innovative styles of presenting intellectual work in the field of curriculum theory.

About the Journal

JCT: Journal of Curriculum Theorizing is an interdisciplinary journal of curriculum studies. It offers an academic forum for scholarly discussions of curriculum. Historically aligned with the “reconceptualist” movement in curriculum theorizing, and oriented toward informing and affecting classroom practice, JCT presents compelling pieces within forms that challenge disciplinary, genre, and textual boundaries. The journal is associated with the Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice, held in the autumn of each year. JCT is indexed in The Education Index.

Online proposal submission opens Monday, June 23, 2014!

JCT joins the many others who are mourning the loss of Maxine Greene.  It is difficult to put into words the immense impact she has had and will continue to have, not only in curriculum theory, but in the education field and beyond.  We wish her family, friends, students, and colleagues our heartfelt condolences.

About Maxine Greene

The Maxine Greene Center
for Aesthetic Education and Social Imagination

in loving memory of Maxine Greene ( December 23, 1917- May 29, 2014)

(https://maxinegreene.org/)

Through inquiries into sociology, history, and especially philosophy and literature, Maxine Greene explored living in awareness and “wide-awakeness” in order to advance social justice. Her thinking about existence and the power of imagination were brought to life through her study, academic appointments, essays and books. In her teaching, she desired to educate those who speak, write, and resist in their own voices, rather than mimic her ideas and language. The full range of human experience is not available to most individuals, but it can be explored, according to Maxine, through literature and the arts.

Maxine received her doctorate in education from New York University in 1955 and went to teach at New York University, Montclair State College and Brooklyn College. In 1965, she joined the faculty at Teachers College, Columbia University, establishing herself as a lone female voice among her male philosophy of education colleagues who found her “too literary.” She was the William F. Russell Professor in the Foundations of Education (emerita) at Teachers College. In 2004, the Teachers College Trustees created the Maxine Greene Chair for Distinguished Contributions to Education.

As Philosopher-in-Residence of the Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education (LCI) since 1976, Maxine conducted workshops, especially in Literature as Art, lectures at LCI’s Summer Sessions, and inspired the creation of a small high school, the High School of Arts, Imagination and Inquiry in association with LCI and New Visions for Public Schools. She is the Philosopher Emeritus for what is now called Lincoln Center Education (LCE).

She founded the Maxine Greene Foundation for Social Imagination, the Arts, and Education in 2003 at Teachers College, Columbia University. She was past President of the American Educational Research Association (AREA), Philosophy of Education Society, American Educational Studies Association (AESA), and the Middle Atlantic States Philosophy of Education Society.

She was the recipient of Honorary Degrees in the Humanities from Lehigh University, Hofstra University, the University of Colorado at Denver, the University of Indiana, Goddard College, Bank Street College, Nazareth College, McGill University, College Misericordia and Binghamton University.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor from Teachers College and Barnard College; Educator of the Year Award from Phi Delta Kappa; the Scholarly Achievement Award from Barnard College; AERA’s Lifetime Achievement Award; and received a Fulbright fellowship, which took her to New Zealand.

Maxine Greene was the president of The Maxine Greene Center for Aesthetic Education and Social Imagination.

Resume

1938 – Graduates from Barnard College
1949 – Receives a Masters degree, New York University
1955 – Receives Ph.D., Philosophy of Education, New York University
1950 – 1955 – Instructor, New York University in Philosophy and Literature in the English Department
1956 – Associate Professor, Montclair College in Literature in the English Department
1962 – Associate Professor, Brooklyn College (CUNY) in Foundations of Education and Philosophy
1965 – Editor, Teachers College Record; and Associate Professor English, then Professor of Philosophy of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University
1976 – Philosopher-in-Residence at the Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education
1984 – First female President of the American Educational Research Association in 31 years
1987 – President of the Philosophy of Education Society
2003 – Founded the Maxine Greene Foundation for Social Imagination, the Arts & Education
2012 – Founded the Maxine Greene Center for Aesthetic Education and Social Imagination
2013 – Publically launched the Maxine Greene Center for Aesthetic Education and Social Imagination

Maxine Greene

Teachers College, Columbia University

http://www.tc.columbia.edu/academics/

MAXINE GREENE was at the forefront of educational philosophy for well over half a century as a teacher, a lecturer and author.

She was the Founder and Director of the Center for Social Imagination, the Arts and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University where she has been on the faculty since 1965 serving as Professor of Philosophy and Education since 1973 and the William F. Russell Professor in the Foundations of Education from 1975 to 1998, and was Professor Emeritus. Since 1976, she had served as the Director of Teachers College-Lincoln Center Project in the Arts and Humanities: “Philosopher in Residence,” Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education. From 1966 to 1973, she served at the Editor of the Teachers College Record. From 1962 to 1965, she was an Associate Professor of Education at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. Between 1949 and 1962, she taught at New York University serving as an Instructor of Philosophy and History of Education and Associate Professor of English Education; and was an Assistant Professor of English at Montclair State College in 1956-1957.

Dr. Maxine Greene lectured widely at universities and educational associations throughout the United States, and was a past President of the Philosophy of Education Society and the American Educational Studies Association, and the American Educational Research Association. She also served on the Executive Council of the John Dewey Society, the Evaluation Committee for the Department of Curriculum at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, the National Council of Teachers of English, the Modern English Language Association and the American Philosophical Association. In 1984, she was elected to the National Academy of Education and received Educator of the Year Awards from Columbia University and Ohio State University.

She was the author of six books: Releasing the Imagination – Essays on Education, the Arts and Social Change (Jossey Bass Publishers, 1995); The Dialectics of Freedom (Teachers College Press, 1988); Landscapes of Learning (Teachers College Press, 1978); Teacher as Stranger: Educational Philosophy in the Modern Age (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1973), which was awarded the 1974 Delta Gamma Kappa Award for Educational Book of the Year; Existential Encounters for Teachers (Random House, 1967); and The Public School and the Private Vision (Random House, 1963). Her monographs included Active Learning and Aesthetic Encounters (Talks at the Lincoln Center Institute, NCREST, 1994); A Teacher Talks to Teachers: Perspectives on the Lincoln Center Institute (Lincoln Center, 1980); and Education, Freedom and Possibility (Russell Lecture, 1975).

Maxine Greene held a PhD (1955) and M.A. (1949) from New York University and a B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University (1938) in addition to nine honorary degrees from universities across the country.

Selected Publications

Books Include:

* Variations on a Blue Guitar (Teachers College Press, 2001)
* Releasing the Imagination – Essays on Education, the Arts and Social Change (Jossey Bass Publishers, 1995)
* The Dialectic of Freedom (Teachers College Press, 1988)
* Landscapes of Learning (Teachers College Press, 1978)
* Teacher as Stranger: Educational Philosophy in the Modern Age (Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1973)
* Existential Encounters for Teachers (Random House, 1967)
* The Public School and the Private Vision (Random House, 1963)

Monographs include:

* Active Learning and Aesthetic Encounters (Talks at the Lincoln Center Institute, NCREST, 1994)
* A Teacher Talks to Teachers: Perspectives on the Lincoln Center Institute (Lincoln Center, 1980)
* Education, Freedom and Possibility (Russell Lecture, 1975)

Please visit Dr. Greene’s web site for details: http://www.maxinegreene.org/books.php

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